Wednesday, May 4, 2011

Obama Kills Osama--Rush Lives in "Realityville"

On Sunday on the way home from my second of two races, I tuned into the Rush Limbaugh highlights show.  I try to listen to Beck, Limbaugh, Savage and Hannity once each month so when I make fun of them, I will have something to quote, not just mention that together they (and all the rest of the Commentariat on the Right) have served exactly ZERO days in the military.

On Sunday Rush said, "I live in Realityville.  If Obama ran today against any Republican, that candidate would win in a landslide."  He went on to say that a plurality of America supports the Ryan budget and the media is distorting the outcry against it.

OK Rush.

And with Osama Bin Laden making the world a better place as shark food, do you really think the latest draft-dodging comb-over Pansy Patriot (Trump) could beat the Commander in Chief of that Navy Seal raid.

It would, of course, be too much to expect the one-note chorus on Right wing radio to celebrate the death of Osama Bin Laden and acknowledge that the President took a big risk in going after the scum bag who planned the attack on America.  If the raid had failed, and it could have, they would have been attacked the President quicker than chicken on a June bug to use the southern expression.

How's things in Realityville Rush?

Blogging Conference Wrap Up

Timing is everything.  If the news out of Washington had been two days earlier, the military blogging conference would have been a celebration of finding and killing Osama Bin Laden.  Jim Dao was at the conference reporting for the New York Times.  His article talks about how military blogging has gone corporate.  Originally it was grunts reporting on the mess they were living through and in some cases getting shut down.

By the time I started blogging in 2007 some of the controversial web sites were already shutting down.  Many more family members are bloggers, which is a good trend.  Military families suffer a lot.  During a deployment like mine where my little physical danger threatened us, my family still had to wait for a year wondering if the war would suddenly turn for the worst.

But for those of us who served during Viet Nam and the Cold War, the whole idea of blogging, even if it has less of an edge than in 2003 is still way ahead of the controlled world of the 60s and 70s.  And really, many soldiers over 30 still don't know what a blog is.